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Comments 1 - 13 of 13

high_madness's avatar

high_madness

I loved it in a very sad way. Found it beautiful, from the animation, the narration, the music up to the poetry that lays beneath. Since you're gonna be dead anyway, everytime you're not it's such a beautiful day.
4 years 10 months ago
TalkingElvish's avatar

TalkingElvish

So glad Hertzfeld can finally put his name next to a feature. Three conjoined shorts or one legitimate feature; any excuse to get people to see this errant genius.
9 years 7 months ago
Carota's avatar

Carota

perfect. hertzfeldt touches me like no other.
6 years 4 months ago
Armoreska's avatar

Armoreska

I guess now spliced together the 3-parter would make it into my 10 favorite long-form animated films
10 years ago
greenhorg's avatar

greenhorg

It's Hertzfeldt's same absurdist stickmen shtick, but successfully enhanced with Stan Brakhage-esque background visuals, and deadpan Jack Handy-esque narration.
9 years 3 months ago
Torgo's avatar

Torgo

Um .. is this just the 3 shorts edited together without any additional sequences? If so, would it be legit to check it if I have seen the shorts, but not the feature film?
9 years 8 months ago
dvdgrdnr's avatar

dvdgrdnr

.
1 month 2 weeks ago
ESG's avatar

ESG

Fine film, but it's in way too many genre list. Bill wears a hat, why not stick it in the western one as well?
3 months 1 week ago
Siskoid's avatar

Siskoid

The three stories about "Bill" that end with the eponymous It's Such a Beautiful Day may form a "trilogy", but it's all one existential story. Don Hertzfeldt's crude figures are wired for pathos and his poetic narration almost barrels by too quickly, taking us into the perspective of his protagonist, one that starts with depression and nihilism and progressively gets worse, losing his faculties with illness and age. Hertzfeldt contrasts the pain of existence with what we could call solace, a release from existential concerns through the shutting down of the mind - whether we want to see it as mental breakdown, brain damage, senility or something like Alzheimer's. The writer-director manages to find more beauty and happiness in the end/death than he does in more lucid moments/life. So while the overall feeling is depressing, albeit very well observed, the piece is ultimately hopeful, positive... lyrical.
1 year 4 months ago
few visible scars's avatar

few visible scars

Re Torgo's comment .. I've seen all three shorts, so I am claiming the whole. If anyone wishes to challenge this by telling me there are differences, I will retract!
5 years 7 months ago
ColinMorgan's avatar

ColinMorgan

a lot of truth in this one
8 years 2 months ago
chryzsh's avatar

chryzsh

me irl
7 years ago
colindavidson's avatar

colindavidson

Now on Netflix US
7 years 11 months ago
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